Skip to main content

Table 1 Special structural and contextual features of ICU nursing narratives.

From: Characteristics of Finnish and Swedish intensive care nursing narratives: a comparative analysis to support the development of clinical language technologies

Structural & contextual features Finland (Finnish examples) Sweden (Swedish examples)
Headings Headings are used in 2 of 3 health records. Headings are used as subjects and subjects are missing.
Diuresis: occasionally profuse.
(Diureesi: ajoittain runsasta.)
Pupils move under eyelids but does not open eyes.
(Pupillit liikkuvat luomien alla, mutta ei avaa silmiään.)
Headings are used in all narratives. The structure of headings seems to be obligatory. The headings are used as subjects.
Circulation: Stable with inotropy.
(Cirkulation: Stabil med inotropi.)
Reacts only to pain stimulation during suctioning of intubation tube.
(Reagerar enbart vid smärtstimuli vid sugning i tuben.)
Tense Present and past participles are typical but be , is and are are not used. The most common tense is perfect.
Consciousness remained unchanged.
(Tajunta pysynyt ennallaan.)
Blood pressure low.
(Verenpaine matala.)
Present and past participles are typical but be , is and are are not used. The most common tense is perfect.
Breathing: Ventilator parameters unchanged.
(Andning: Ventilator parametrarna oförändrade.)
Structure of sentences Complete sentences are rare.
No spontaneous movements, rigidifies.
(Ei spontaania liikettä, jäykistelee.)
Complete sentences are rare.
Light sedation, looks up now and then.
(Lätt sederad, tittar upp ibland.).
Misspelling Misspellings exist but the meaning is clear.
Henodynamics
(Henodynamiikka)
Misspellings exist but the meaning is clear.
The motther is informed.
(Mammman är informered.)
Subjects (a patient) The word patient as a subject is infrequently mentioned. If this word is mentioned it is not abbreviated.
Oxygenates well or ventilates well.
(Happeutuu hyvin tai ventiloituu hyvin.)
The word patient is used more often as a subject or object than in Finnish narratives. It is also replaced with abbreviations Pat or Pt . Use of patient was 40 % more common than she / he .
Patient got a percutanous tracheostomy today.
(Patienten har fått en perkutan trakeostomi idag.)
Very worried about patient’s condition.
(Mycket oroliga över patientens tillstånd.)
Pt. wakes up when talked to and appears to be oriented.
(Pt. vakner på tilltal och upplevs som adekvat.)
Signs and abbreviations Signs and abbreviations are common. They originate from Finnish, Swedish, English, Latin, or professional jargon.
The height of the drain rose from 10 -->20 mmHg.
(Dreneerausrajaa nostettu 10 -->20 mmHg.)
Got medicine -->good response.
(Sai lääkettä -->hyvä vaste.)
Signs and abbreviations are common. They originate from Swedish, English, Latin, or professional jargon.
(em. [eftermiddag, afternoon])
CVP [Central Venous Pressure]
EN [Enteral Nutrition]
TPN [Total Parenteral Nutrition]
pO2 [partial pressure of oxygen]
pCO2 [partial pressure of carbon dioxide]
MAP [Mean Arterial Pressure].